WEB EXCLUSIVE: Airport Hangar Receives A New Retrofit Roof System And Energy Upgrade

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webexclusiveThis Web exclusive was submitted by Mark James on behalf of Roof Hugger.

The Lafayette, Louisiana Regional Airport underwent a retrofit re-roof and energy upgrade on its 114 Borman aircraft hangar building. The project was out of the ordinary for a re-roof, since the existing metal roof was barreled. This required the new metal roof to be jobsite curved.

David Furr of Roofing Solutions, LLC of Prairieville, LA, stated that the 120 foot long roof panels were roll-formed and curved on site. According to Anel Ayala, jobsite superintendent for Roofing Solutions, this was time consuming and challenging; it took up to 15 workers at a time to stage the panels atop the old roof.

The new 24-gauge McElroy Metal “238T” standing seam metal roof was provided in a Regal White color with an overall coverage area of 31,500 square feet.

The new 24-gauge McElroy Metal “238T” standing seam metal roof was provided in a Regal White color with an overall coverage area of 31,500 square feet.

The retrofit sub-framing was provided by Roof Hugger, Inc. of Odessa, FL. The 7,000 lineal feet of new 16-gauge factory-notched sub-purlins were manufactured five-inches deep to accommodate full thickness fiberglass rolled insulation with a thermal resistance value of R-13 being installed in the cavity between the old and new roofs. Due to high wind speeds for the southern Louisiana area, McElroy Metal installed continuous clips available with the “238T” roof system to satisfy the wind uplift without requiring additional sub-framing in the corners and edges of the roof. This is cost-effective both from a materials and labor standpoint.

Roof Hugger and McElroy Metal have successfully completed numerous projects since they signed a licensing agreement in late 2011. Jobs have ranged from small to very large projects. More recently, in North Texas where it is common to experience severe late spring hail storms, the two manufacturers shipped materials in late 2012 to several very large projects in the Dallas area alone.

While the building’s existing metal roofs were still functional and weathertight, they were cosmetically damaged to such a degree that the owner’s insurer signed off for new roofs to be installed directly over the old roofs. These projects consisted of two self-storage facilities, a church assembly building, and an indoor tennis facility.

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